Image from page 156 of “Everything for the garden : 1920” (1920)

Image from page 156 of

Identifier: everythingforgar19pete_17
Title: Everything for the garden : 1920
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Peter Henderson & Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Seeds Catalogs Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs Books Catalogs Lawn mowers Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Catalogs Flowers Catalogs
Publisher: New York : Peter Henderson & Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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list of Implements. Tools and Requisites, for the Garden, Lawn and Farm, We also distribute a separate list of Planet Jr Implements, anda Spraijing Calendar. We are pleased to send any of these upon request. The Henderson &iiS Lawn Mower THE KING OF LAWN MOWERS DURABLE SELF-ADJUSTING DRAW CUT ALWAYS .SHARP LEAVES THE LAWN SMOOTH AND FREE FROM CORRUGATION LIGHT RUNNING NOISELESS DOES NOT PULL THE GRASS THE HENDERSON BALL-BEARING MOWER has high drive wheels.largo, open non-clogging cylinder The spiral of the knivs is correctlyproportioned to givs a continuous ^ut, leaving the lawn a? smooth as if6haved entirely free from the corrugated surface left by other Mowers.The handles are braced and re-nforced to prevent twisting and breakingwhen fne side of the Mower is held off the ground, and besides rhe handleis equipped with improved grips which keeps the hands in a naturalposition, gives more power, and is less tiresome than a continued grasp,with wrists twisted, on a horizontal grip.

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THE HENDERSON BALL-BEARING LAWN MOWER is made withoutregard to cost-—to be the best, most durable, and the easiest-working Moweron the market, and while the prices are necessarily a little higher than thoseof Mowers simply made to sell, yet in the end our Mower will prove muchcheaper, aside from annoying delays and repairs experienced with cheapMowers. It is superior to all other Mowers in the following respects: The-axles of the revolving cutter, like the axles of a bicycle, work in self-adjustingball-bearing journal boxes or cups, which reduces the friction enormously.The Mower is also built scientifically correct in other respects. The draw-cut principle corrects the defect in push cut LawnMowers, and completely reverses the old way of cutting thegrass. The grass is drawn across the sharp edge of the Stati-onary Knife, which is the cutting knife, and is severed mosteasily, causing the mower to operate much more easily. italso prevents the mower from bobbing up in the rear,thus in

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Tagged: , bookid:everythingforgar19pete_17 , bookyear:1920 , bookdecade:1920 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Peter_Henderson___Co , bookauthor:Henry_G__Gilbert_Nursery_and_Seed_Trade_Catalog_Collection , booksubject:Seeds_Catalogs , booksubject:Gardening_Equipment_and_supplies_Catalogs , booksubject:Books_Catalogs , booksubject:Lawn_mowers_Catalogs , booksubject:Bulbs__Plants__Catalogs , booksubject:Flowers_Catalogs , bookpublisher:New_York___Peter_Henderson___Co_ , bookcontributor:U_S__Department_of_Agriculture__National_Agricultural_Library , booksponsor:U_S__Department_of_Agriculture__National_Agricultural_Library , bookleafnumber:156 , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:usda-nurseryandseedcatalog , bookcollection:usdanationalagriculturallibrary , bookcollection:fedlink , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

Image from page 12 of “California Garden, Vol. 2, No. 6, December 1910” (1910)

Image from page 12 of

Identifier: calgarden1910vol2no6
Title: California Garden, Vol. 2, No. 6, December 1910
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: San Diego Floral Association
Subjects: gardening San Diego California Horticulture
Publisher: San Diego Floral Association
Contributing Library: San Diego Floral Association
Digitizing Sponsor: Balboa Park Online Collaborative

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ave theirnames and addresses in The Garden, sopeople who want their services will knowwhere to find them. A. The same query has occurred to usand we are now arranging for a columnfor such names, which will be inserted forthree months for $1.50, payable in ad-vance. Q. In preparing new ground for flowersI find it plentifully populated with a large,black worm, as well as numerous smallerones. Are these the natural enemies ofplants and flowers? If so I see troubleahead. A. Soil probably soggy and sour. Limewater will kill the worms and also sweetenthe soil. These particular worms wouldprobably not destroy plant life, but wouldindicate a condition of the ;soil whichwould be fatal to plants. Cut worms, cat-erpillars, etc., are destructive. Nearly allof the troublesome ones are green orgreenish brown. Remember The Garden when making outyour list of Christmas presents. Fiftycents makes a present which will be use-ful all the year. Noiseless falls the foot of time that o?ilytreads on flowers.

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PoultrySupplies Thoroughbred Fowls, IncubatorsEggs for Hatching ««« Garden and Field Seeds Nursery Stock and Supplies Wire Fence, Stock Food ««« San Diego County PoultryAssociation INCORPORATED 1905 Home Phone, 3321Sunset, Main 1440 926 Sixth St., San Diego, Cal. J. W. Sampsell, Manager. SecurityFor Your Savings A Bank with Assets of Over$2,500,000.00, that Pays Interest on the Accountsof Over 6300 Depositors San Diego SavingsBank Keating Block, Fifth and F Sts. The Oldest and largest Savings Bank in SouthernCalifornia, Outside of L,os Angreles. M. T. Gilmore, Pres. J. W. Sefton, Vice-Pres. K- M. Barber, Cashier 12 The California Garden A Walk Through Lifes Garden % The dawn is breaking. In the easta light struggles to dissipate the dark-ness, forerunner of that bright orb ofday. The sky is rosy. We look be-hind trying to pierce the haze that stillhangs over the scene, but we cannotlook into the infinite, we can but askourselves, Whence? We start onward with buoyant step.All is

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Tagged: , bookid:calgarden1910vol2no6 , bookyear:1910 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:San_Diego_Floral_Association , booksubject:gardening , booksubject:San_Diego , booksubject:California , booksubject:Horticulture , bookpublisher:San_Diego_Floral_Association , bookcontributor:San_Diego_Floral_Association , booksponsor:Balboa_Park_Online_Collaborative , bookleafnumber:12 , bookcollection:californiagarden , bookcollection:additional_collections

Image from page 223 of “Popular gardening and fruit growing; An illustrated periodical devoted to horticulture in all its branches” (1885)

Image from page 223 of

Identifier: populargardening9091buff
Title: Popular gardening and fruit growing; An illustrated periodical devoted to horticulture in all its branches
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Buffalo, New York Popular gardening publishing company
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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t Hughes Firtreeoil is fatal to them, as also to all kinds oflice and scales. For the mites, we use ahalf pint of oil to two gallons of water, andthe material may be applied with a syringeor knapsack pump. The root-gall, caused by a nematole worm{Hetcrudcra riidiclcola), often does greatdamage in Tomato houses. Remove thesoil from benches and wash the boards thoroughly with lye and thenadd new soil.We have not had serious difficulty withfungi. The rot of the fruit has been theworst and this has appeared chiefly inspring. Spraying with either ammoniacalcarbonate of copper or Bordeaux mixturekeeps the trouble in check. We prefer thecarbonate of copper because it is moreeasily made and applied and it does notdiscolor the plants and fruits so much asthe other. There are two or three goodrecipes for preparing the carbonate of cop-per. We dissolvethree ounces of carbon-ate of copper in a quart of ammonia andkeep this as a stock solution. Two fluidounces (half a gill, four tablespoonfuls) is

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THE BLACK DEFIANCE STRAWBERRY. Scc Nvli added to a pail (two gallons) of water whendesired for use. Fruit Outlook in Central Missouri. SAMUEL MILLER, MONTGOMERY CO., MO. The Strawberry crop was a good one, butmuch of it was lost owing to too much rain.The same may be said about Cherries. Welost half our crop of Napoleons in one day. Currants and Gooseberries are a fair crop,also Raspberries. Let me ask why theSeneca is not mentioned anymore? I stillkeep a few stools for memorys sake, andthere is not a finer flavored or more produc-tive Blackcap on my place. The Centennial is again the earliest withme, and has taken the place of Souheganentirely. My Shaeffers Collosal are bend-ing to the ground under their load of fruit.Plums will be but a slim crop. Wild Goosehas only a few specimens. Golden Beauty,De Soto and Richland are the only ones bear-ing a full crop. They escaped the late frost. Of Peaches, there is the largest crop I eversaw, and in many instances I take off eight-tenths of t

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Tagged: , bookid:populargardening9091buff , bookyear:1885 , bookdecade:1880 , bookcentury:1800 , bookpublisher:Buffalo__New_York , bookpublisher:_Popular_gardening_publishing_company , bookcontributor:UMass_Amherst_Libraries , booksponsor:UMass_Amherst_Libraries , bookleafnumber:223 , bookcollection:americana , bookcollection:blc , BHL Collection

Image from page 284 of “Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved” (1919)

Image from page 284 of

Identifier: horticulturetext02davi
Title: Horticulture; a text book for high schools and normals, including plant propagation; plant breeding; gardening; orcharding; small fruit growing; forestry; beautifying home grounds; the soils and enemies involved
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Davis, Kary Cadmus, 1867-1936
Subjects: Gardening Vegetable gardening Fruit-culture
Publisher: Philadelphia, London, J. B. Lippincott company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Fig. 188.—Native chestnuts are used forfood. They are planted to produce stocksfor propagation of the better sorts. ENGLISH WALNUTS 271 Native Walnuts.—Black walnuts are grown in nearly all statesexcept the northern tier. They are used chiefly for home con-sumption or are sold in local markets. Few are shipped to distantmarkets. The large trees are readily grown from seed. Theyproduce a fine quality of dark colored wood from which theyderive the name black walnut. Butternuts or white walnuts, are similar to the above. Thetrees have a lighter colored wood. They have a more limitedrange and the nuts are not so generally used.

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Fig. 189.—Thin shelled pecans of the Stewart variety. (U.S.D.A.) Pecans are found native from Illinois and Iowa southward to theGulf states. In the warmer regions they are grown commerciallyin orchards. There are a number of very fine varieties that arepropagated chiefly by budding on seedling stocks. Large nutswith thin shells are much preferred in the markets (Fig. 189). The wide range of soil and conditions under which pecans may begrown, and the prices for the nuts, should cause a more extensiveplanting of commercial orchards. English Walnuts (Fig. 190) were early introduced from Persia towestern Europe and the New World. The trees are grown forshade and for nuts in all parts of the eastern coast states south- 272 NUTS AND SUBTROPICAL FRUITS ward from Philadelphia, and in the middle parts of the country.The commercial nuts come chiefly from the Pacific coast (Fig.194, E). It is necessary to grow the trees in numbers to insurecomplete pollination. A few named varieties are propag

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Tagged: , bookid:horticulturetext02davi , bookyear:1919 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Davis__Kary_Cadmus__1867_1936 , booksubject:Gardening , booksubject:Vegetable_gardening , booksubject:Fruit_culture , bookpublisher:Philadelphia__London__J__B__Lippincott_company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:The_Library_of_Congress , bookleafnumber:284 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:fedlink , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium