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Image from page 124 of “Gardens of celebrities and celebrated gardens in and around London” (1918)

Image from page 124 of

Identifier: gardensofcelebri00macg
Title: Gardens of celebrities and celebrated gardens in and around London
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Macgregor, Jessie
Subjects: Gardens
Publisher: London : Hutchinson & co.
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
mpton Court. The little garden is primarily a rose-garden, although a few lateirises of a shade approaching mauve—a more refined variety ofthe earlier and common purple flag—are prominently introduced.It was strange to see irises and roses in juxtaposition, andflowering in the same month—but in this garden, and probablyin others, that year, the seasons met each other, and April andMay clasped hands with June. The bishops head-gardener himselfremarked to me that: This year everything has come up to-gether ! So lovely it was in consequence—Nature with immenseprodigality pouring out all her wealth and beauty at one and thesame time, that by slightly altering the words of the old madrigal,one might apply them to this garden, and say : When first I saw its face I resolvedTo honour and renown it. And to this end I had meant to spend most loving labour on it.Alas! April, May, and June, were lovely months, then followedthe deluge, and very literally so ; the rose beds were swept by 92

Text Appearing After Image:
FULHAM : Gateicay between Walled Garden and Grounds Page ga FULHAM PALACE storms of rain, and the red, white, and pink petals were everywherescattered on the sodden ground. Outdoor work was entirelystopped, and when by the middle of August it was possible toresume it, the glory of that garden had departed! That sweetoasis amid the kitchen-gardens produce—so fresh and so brilliantin the early summer—ere the harvest-moon had risen, resembledthe face of a beauty all passee and forlorn. Yet the flowers at Fulham are always choice and glorious, andone cannot take leave of the Bishop of Londons garden withoutoffering a tribute of sincere admiration to the presiding spiritamong the gardeners, who, short-handed owing to the war, hadyet contrived to preserve so much of their ancient beauty, by skill,personal care, and indefatigable zeal. Of Fulham Bishop Blomfield said—and he knew the place,for nearly thirty years—that it is a home dearly loved, so closeupon the restless world, yet its

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-29 21:30:42

Tagged: , bookid:gardensofcelebri00macg , bookyear:1918 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Macgregor__Jessie , booksubject:Gardens , bookpublisher:London___Hutchinson___co_ , bookcontributor:University_of_British_Columbia_Library , booksponsor:University_of_British_Columbia_Library , bookleafnumber:124 , bookcollection:ubclibrary , bookcollection:toronto , BHL Collection

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