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Image from page 154 of “The garden bluebook;” (1915)

Image from page 154 of

Identifier: gardenbluebook00holl
Title: The garden bluebook;
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Holland, Leicester Bodine, 1882- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Perennials. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, Page & company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
iage (Hobit & Height) Uses Culture Propevg ation CHRYSANTHEMUM (From the Greek chrysos, golden, and anthemon, flower)Composite 113. Chrysanthemum maximumEnglish Name: Giant daisy. PYRENEES JUNE AND JULY IARGE white flowers with yellow centres, like large field daisies, carried-/ from one to two feet high on the ends of upright stems which aresimple, or branch at the very base, and are leafless for three to four inchesbelow the flower. Leaveslong and narrowed at thebase. An excellent andshowy plant for the her-baceous border, and verygood for cutting. A perfectly hardy per-ennial of easy culturein rich garden soil. Itshould be mulched andwell-watered during thegrowing season for bestresults, but will stand con-siderable neglect withoutserious harm. Preferssun. Propagate by seeds,cuttings, or by division. C. Shasta Daisy, anew and much-advertisedform developed by Bur-bank. Very much likeC. maximum in every re-spect; possibly a littlelarger in flower and of alonger blossoming season.

Text Appearing After Image:
137 Name YEAR 19 19 49 19 APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOTES ON THEYEARS CLIMATICCONDITIONS EW General Observations N2 LATIN NAME Common Name Season Habitat Flower (Color & Height) Plant & Foliage (Habit & Height) Uses Culture Propagation CLEMATIS (From the Greek kltmatis, the name of some climbing plant)Ranunculacea 46. Clematis heracleaefolia, var. Davidiana (C. Davididna;C. Tubulosa, var. Davididna) English Name: Shrubby clematis. CHINA AND JAPAN AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER SMALL, china-blue, hyacinth-shaped flowers, with a fragrance likeorange blossoms, borne in clusters of six to fifteen, or singly, at theends or in the axils of erect, almost vinelike stems three to four feet high.Leaves very large andbright green. An excel-lent plant for the borderor rock garden, and goodfor cutting. A hardy perennial ofeasy culture. The bestsoil is a deep, rich lightloam which must be well-drained, and is improvedby having a very littlelime mixed with it.Should be enriched atleast o

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 05:36:12

Tagged: , bookid:gardenbluebook00holl , bookyear:1915 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Holland__Leicester_Bodine__1882___from_old_catalog_ , booksubject:Perennials___from_old_catalog_ , bookpublisher:Garden_City__N_Y___Doubleday__Page___company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:The_Library_of_Congress , bookleafnumber:154 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:fedlink , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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