Home » Gardening » Image from page 160 of “Lawns and gardens. How to plant and beautify the home lot, the pleasure ground and garden” (1897)

Image from page 160 of “Lawns and gardens. How to plant and beautify the home lot, the pleasure ground and garden” (1897)

Image from page 160 of

Identifier: lawnsgardenshowt00jn
Title: Lawns and gardens. How to plant and beautify the home lot, the pleasure ground and garden
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Jönsson-Rose, Nils
Subjects: Gardening Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : G. P. Putnam
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ctures cannot be fullytreated here. A s;reat mistake often committed in design-ing bridges for public parks and gardens is to make thedesign too heavy and elaborate. All carvings or architec-tural affectations are decidedly out of place. Simplebridges just large enough to serve their purpose, either ofnatural wood or something after the manner shown in Fig.78, are best in harmony with natural scenery. jBmirunas anJ> Enclosures. 141 Steps are sometimes needed 011 very steep grades orterraces. In formal gardens and near a dwelling-housethey should be of hewn stone, but where the garden is freeand natural the steps may be made of rough stones withoutmortar or cement, bordered by a few scattered rocks andstones half buried in the adjoining lawns. Wood can alsobe used, and in that case a board six or eight inches wideis simply put across the walk and nailed to posts drivenvertically into the grouud. Gravel is then filled in to thetop of the board, and another step is made a foot or more

Text Appearing After Image:
FIQ. 79.—IRON FENCE AND GATES. behind, and so on for the required distance. The face ofthe board should be covered with split sticks of a uniformsize nailed vertically to the front. Fences and enclosures, if any, must be of neat designand proportionate in size. One that affords every neces-sary protection, and at the same time leaves the gardenexposed to the view of the passers-by, is shown in Fig.79. It is made of round iron bars run through flat topand bottom pieces, and placed firmly on a low stone founda-tion with stone pillars on each side of the entrance to which 142 Buil&ings an& Enclosures. the gafcej .ire hung. The pillars are in this instancesurmounted by flower vases. A stone enclosure suitablefor rural suburbs is represented in Fig. 80. It may bemade either with or without mortar, and in the lattercase will furnish good places for ferns ami rock-plants.This enclosure needs to lie covered with strong vines andclimbers. Brambles, climbing roses, trumpet-flower, and

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-29 03:26:38

Tagged: , bookid:lawnsgardenshowt00jn , bookyear:1897 , bookdecade:1890 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:J__nsson_Rose__Nils , booksubject:Gardening , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___G__P__Putnam , bookcontributor:University_of_Illinois_Urbana_Champaign , booksponsor:University_of_Illinois_Urbana_Champaign , bookleafnumber:160 , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection

About Pro Gardener

Share a little biographical information here to fill out your profile as the author.
Just fill the “Biographical Info” form in the User Profile section in your Dashboard. Also… use your email that connect with Gravatar, so your pict will appear in the left.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Scroll To Top