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Image from page 168 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 168 of

Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
The work of the early American silversmiths is eagerly sought forby museums and private collectors, and authentic examples are becom-ing exceedingly rare. The tray, porringer, small creamer and sugar-tongs were made by Paul Revere. The coffee-pot to the left wasmade by Benjamin Burt as forcibly to the skill withwhich they were made as tothe joviality of the occasionswhich they doubtless adorned.As might be expected, muchof the most beautiful of theearly American plate wasmade for the service of re-ligion, and much which wasnot made for church use be-came the property of thechurch by gift or bequest. It seems a little startlingto think of silver flagons andgoblets made for householduse appearing upon the com-munion table, but anotheraspect shows it to be rever-ent and fitting that the treas-ures which were the mostvalued of domestic posses-sions should be given for theservice of the church. Thecommunion services madefor use in many of the New March, 1913 AMERICAN HOMES AND GARDENS 97

Text Appearing After Image:
Flagons and ewers from old Colonial churches in and around Boston,for the church in Brattle Street, 1711. The flagon to the right was North Church, England churches include the beautifully fashioned beak-ers with or without covers, more or less elaborately deco-rated. In localities where the influence of the establishedchurch was strong, the communion service was apt to includechalices with the enlarged bowl made necessary by theadministering of the wine to the people. The various Brit-ish sovereigns gave liberally to the parishes of the Estab-lished Church in far-away America, and many Episcopalchurches in New England, New York and the States farthersouth, possess communion services given by Queen Anne,William and Mary, or the Georges. Kings Chapel in Bos-ton, by reason of its dignity and importance, received manytokens of royal bounty and favor, and its collection wasgreatly augmented by the gifts of Colonial silver made byfervent parishioners in Boston. The extent of its posses-sio

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 08:52:02

Tagged: , bookid:americanhomesga101913newy , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___Munn_and_Co , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Biodiversity_Heritage_Library , bookleafnumber:168 , bookcollection:biodiversity , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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