Home » Gardening » Image from page 284 of “The open door to independence; making money from the soil; what to do–how to do, on city lots, suburban grounds, country farms, together with outline maps of all parts of the United States, irrigated regions, climates, cities, vil

Image from page 284 of “The open door to independence; making money from the soil; what to do–how to do, on city lots, suburban grounds, country farms, together with outline maps of all parts of the United States, irrigated regions, climates, cities, vil

Image from page 284 of

Identifier: opendoortoindepe00hill
Title: The open door to independence; making money from the soil; what to do–how to do, on city lots, suburban grounds, country farms, together with outline maps of all parts of the United States, irrigated regions, climates, cities, villages, market towns, locations and populations
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Hill, Thomas E. (Thomas Edie), 1832-1915
Subjects: Agriculture
Publisher: Chicago, Hill standard book company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
mer, so that good, healthyplants and a profusion of flowerswill be had the following year.A light mulch of manure is de-sirable for winter protection. Marigold Tagets Erecta, AfricanThese old fr^sliioned favorites arehardy annuals of the easiest cul-ture. A beautiful plant forming aglobular compact bush coveredwith rich, golden, double flowers.Especially fine in mixed borders.Height 3 feet. When transplant-ing keep 6 inches apart. Culture.—Seeds should be plantedin the open ground after all dan-ger of frost is over; if desiredearly, start in window-box; plantscan be transplanted to the openas soon as warm weather appears.A rich garden soil, deeply digand liberally enriched with ma-nure, is best. Maurandia BarclayanaHeight Five to Eight FeetAn elegant climbing, greenhouseperennial, but can be grown fromseed, and brought forward so asto branch and flower profuselyfrom middle of summer till frost,the first season, in the garden. Oneof the most popular climbers forpiazza decoration. 270

Text Appearing After Image:
#ne llunbreb ^arietiesi of Jfaborite Jflofcoers; DirectionsHOW TO PLANT AND CULTIVATE GIVEN ELSEWHERE IN THIS VOLUME

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-29 03:01:41

Tagged: , bookid:opendoortoindepe00hill , bookyear:1915 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Hill__Thomas_E___Thomas_Edie___1832_1915 , booksubject:Agriculture , bookpublisher:Chicago__Hill_standard_book_company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:284 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:fedlink , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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