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Image from page 320 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 320 of

Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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were also published in 1765 by RobertMainwaring, by Inches and Mayhew, and in 1773the Brothers Adams followed their example. Of allthese, Chippendale easilyleads. He was consid-ered authority for thirtyyears. His favorite piecesof furniture were chairs,and in them he blended theideas of the French, theDutch, in the bandy legsand straight back, and theChinese, which were fashion-able about the middle of theeighteenth century. The results were master-pieces. Many of the chairshad broad seats, bow-shapedtop rail, arms with well-known curves ending in scrollwork, with and withoutstretchers, the ornamenta-tions often confined to thefront leg, while the back legswere straight and plain,copied from the Chinese. The splat back and bandylegs, copied from the Dutch,were united with the orna-mentation of the splat inmodified Gothic forms.Often the full curve of thebandy leg terminated in theball and claw feet which areso commonly used by Chip-pendale and his imitators,although his published book

Text Appearing After Image:
contains not a single example of this particular style.One of these chairs which is considered very handsome,is in the Harrod family at Newburyport, Massachusetts.It is one of a set of six chairs showing ball and claw feet,and with bandy legs. This chair was inherited from oneof the early ancestors who was the owner of the ordinaryor inn, known as Harrods Tavern, the sign for which waspainted representing the Freemasons Arm. This ordinarywas a noted hostelry in Haverhill, and it was here thatGeneral Washington spent a night during his stay in thatcity. Another Chippendale of equally handsome proportions,showing carved back, is in the Middleton House at Bristol,Rhode Island. This was inherited from Henry Middleton,one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Much of Chippendales work was done in mahogany,which was the favorite wood of his time. His skill wasdisplayed in wonderful carving derived from varioussources, but resolved by his taste into a harmonious whole. The effec

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 09:33:40

Tagged: , bookid:americanhomesga101913newy , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___Munn_and_Co , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Biodiversity_Heritage_Library , bookleafnumber:320 , bookcollection:biodiversity , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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