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Image from page 369 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 369 of

Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
s never too hot for sleeping pur-poses. The lower floor is the airiestkind of a living-room, and the roughhand-hewn timbers which form the in-side and which are weather beaten withage, lend themselves well to the effectiveuse of burlap, crude straw mats, and thesimple old-time furniture which isprincipally used here. The round rag mat on the floor was aparticularly happy idea, fitting into thesurroundings and adding to the sym-metry of the rooms. This house hasbeen named the Guest House, and is re-moved from the rest of the buildings so 208 AMERICAN HOMES AND GARDENS June, 1913 that no odors ofcooking come to it,and the fresh sweetbreezes blow through.The living part ofthe home, where thereal housekeeping isdone, is in the prettypeaked house whichis connected with thewindmill by a coveredveranda. This househas a large dining-room with a brickedopen fireplace, and islighted by large win-dows on either side ofthe room. It is hungwith pretty chintz,which adds brightnessand also keeps the

Text Appearing After Image:
Held, Massachusetts,blends well with thequaint structure ofthe old mill. The third building,low and of the bunga-low type, with apeaked roof, is inharmony with boththe others. Viewingthem as they standto-day, it is hard torealize that the ar-rangement was noteasily accomplished,especially with thelatter building, whichwas twisted andturned many timesafter it was all built,before the right spot The dining-room light from streaming in with too much glare. The dining- was found. It was necessary that it should carry out rather room, with its old-fashioned dining table and large rag than interrupt the general scheme of rambling growth. mat, carries out the scheme idea of the whole house. The porch which connects the mill and the peaked house Back of the dining-room is the kitchen, while two good- is one of the most interesting features. Here again the sized bedrooms are in the high peaked roof. The building irregularity of the grounds was used to advantage in order of these two houses did

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 09:47:29

Tagged: , bookid:americanhomesga101913newy , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___Munn_and_Co , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Biodiversity_Heritage_Library , bookleafnumber:369 , bookcollection:biodiversity , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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