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Image from page 389 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 389 of

Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
in ing are inseparable unless one descends to the state of fact, an intensely brilliant scarlet. becoming merely a planteror a harvester. I supposethere will always be in theworld some who find nopleasure in growing thingsto whom Nature appears amatter of dirt, brambles, andpotatoes, something to bekept somewhere out in theback yard in contradistinc-tion to the satisfaction theyfind in unadorned macada-mized expanses of avenue andsidewalk. Fortunately, how-ever, the Genius of Gardeningtrusts nothing to their keep-ing, and so it happens thatthe traditions of the gar-deners art are safe with us.WE who find our en-thusiasm perennialwill be occupying ourselveswith many things this monthof June. There are latevegetable crops to sow—car-rots, potatoes and beets.Again those vegetables forlater succession which willbe going into the groundnow are radishes, sweetcorn, turnips and beans.The transplanting will like-wise keep us busy. Many ofus will look forward tobringing to maturity delicious

Text Appearing After Image:
I Cauliflower plants to attain such perfection at maturity as is shown hereshould be set out this month in rich, well-drained soil NSECT pests must beguarded against. Cut-worms are particularly hurt-ful at this time and you mustwatch the tender youngplants carefully. Berrybushes and fruit trees shouldhave a couple of June spray-ings. But even the insectenemies of plants are notmore damaging than weedswhen allowed to grow andchoke the gardens. By be-ginning the weeding early,and by consistently keeping itup the growing plants willhave a fair fighting chanceto reach unstunted maturity.By this day-by-day weedingthe labor attendant on keep-ing the flower beds and vege-table beds in condition willbe greatly lessened and thepleasure in gardening in-tensified. Look into thetrimming of Privet hedgesat this time and put outGladioli and Dahlias.Among the former some ofthe best varieties are Ceres(pure white), Charles Mar-tel (rose) and Brenchley-ensis (scarlet-vermilion).The seedsmen offer a fi

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 09:57:17

Tagged: , bookid:americanhomesga101913newy , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___Munn_and_Co , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Biodiversity_Heritage_Library , bookleafnumber:389 , bookcollection:biodiversity , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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