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Image from page 443 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 443 of

Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
and rather gloomy interior.Let us suppose theevening is hot and humidand that what little lifethere is in the air is to befound on the porch or lawnwhere we wish to sit. Be-fore leaving the living-roomit would be a wise plan togo to the hall closet and onthe shelf will be found a boxcontaining numerous all-night candles, the kind thatare used in sick rooms,where little light but a verylong one is desired. Thereare three or four very deco-rative candle lamps in theform of a lotos flower ontall highly polished standswith shades of rice paper,white not cream. In thesethe night candles are placedand lighted. One is put inthe living-room, one in thehall and one in the library.The rooms are at once filledwith a soft diffused radiancethat saves the house fromhaving the appearance of agloomy cavern and, at the

Text Appearing After Image:
An iron side lantern of distinctive design such as is used in altar lampsand let as many little tap-ers float about as can com-fortably do so and whenthese are lighted the effectof the bowls all aglow isvery charming. It will sur-prise you to see how muchlight will come from theselittle flames and how verylittle heat they give out.If you are clever with thebrush, a design in oil paintcan be applied, but the chiefcharm is, I think, in thelight showing through aclear crystal bowl. Lampshades made of black woodwith the openings filled inwith rice paper and coveredwith Japanese stencils makevery effective and satis-factory lighting. The plainbottoms of the invertedceiling lights may be madea decorative feature byplacing Japanese shades onthem with the panels filledwith some decorative silkor paper, as the case maybe, and hung from the ceil- July, 1913 AMERICAN HOMES AND GARDENS 259 ing with colored silk cord. For a room that you do not for a screw top in which a glass bowl is screwed or a

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 10:13:27

Tagged: , bookid:americanhomesga101913newy , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___Munn_and_Co , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Biodiversity_Heritage_Library , bookleafnumber:443 , bookcollection:biodiversity , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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