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Image from page 448 of “American homes and gardens” (1905)

Image from page 448 of

Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy
Title: American homes and gardens
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening
Publisher: New York : Munn and Co
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ps of the flavoring used in the cake, and confec-tioners sugar enough to make the thickness of rich cream.Sprinkle the top with chopped nuts and press lightly intothe icing. Gentlemen always like my little mince pies. Take themuffin tins and line with pastry. Put in one tablespoon ofmince meat in each, and moisten the edges with cold water.With the cover of a pound can of baking powder cut outthe tops of the pies pressing well against the sides of the tin.Prick three or four times with a fork to let out the steam. The matter of drinks is the most serious one when con-sidering transportation. The drinking cups or tumblers areheavy and may not be burned up. It is necessary to have apail to bring water in, whether you walk or ride. I havetried, and never yet succeeded, in doing away with thisburden. I may lighten it but cannot get rid of it. Lemon punch is about the most condensed drink to carrythat I know of. Take the juice of four lemons, or five if MARSHMALLOW CAKE By Mary H. Norlhend

Text Appearing After Image:
Morshmallow Cake. Cream one third cup butter, gradually beat in onecup sugar. Sift together two and one half teaspoonfuls baking powder,one and one quarter cup of flour, one half cup cornstarch, and addalternately to creamed mixture, with one half cup of milk; then addone teaspoonful flavoring and fold in stiffly beaten whites of threeeggs. Frost with the following: Heat two tablespoonfuls milk andsix tablespoonfuls sugar over fire; boil six minutes without stirring.In double boiler heat one quarter pound cut marshmallows; when verysoft, add two tablespoonfuls boiling water and cook until smooth.Beat in hot sugar, keep beating until partly cooled, then one halfteaspoonful vanilla. Use at once, spreading generously over top andsides. Dot with maraschino cherries, as shown in the illustration. they are a bit dry, and two cups of sugar; put into a quartjar. Fill up the jar with tea. Shake until the sugar is thor-oughly dissolved. When ready to serve, put a portion intoeach tumbler and fi

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 10:14:33

Tagged: , bookid:americanhomesga101913newy , bookyear:1905 , bookdecade:1900 , bookcentury:1900 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Landscape_gardening , bookpublisher:New_York___Munn_and_Co , bookcontributor:Smithsonian_Libraries , booksponsor:Biodiversity_Heritage_Library , bookleafnumber:448 , bookcollection:biodiversity , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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