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Image from page 122 of “An encyclopædia of gardening;” (1826)

Image from page 122 of

Identifier: encyclopdiaofgar00loud
Title: An encyclopædia of gardening;
Year: 1826 (1820s)
Authors: Loudon, J. C. (John Claudius), 1783-1843
Subjects: Gardening
Publisher: London, Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown and Green
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
e grape, with an elegant garden, generally occupies thewhole. The lands are surrounded and divided by oak and quince hedges; and the vines, cultivated as inFrance and Germany, have the appearance of plantations of raspberries. The Cape-market is richlysupplied from these gardens. Between Table Bay and False Bay, are the two farms producing the Con-stantia wine. Here most of the above fruits thrive; but gooseberries, currants, plums, and cherries donot succeed at all. The ornamental -plants of the Cape are well known; to them we are indebted for almost all our heaths,ixias, diosmas, pelargonums, and many other genera. {Kingdoms British Colonies, p. 81.) 503. New South Wales. There are two colonies established in this extensive territoryand its adjoining islands; the one at Sidney, in 1788, and the other at Van DiemensLand some years afterwards. The botanical riches of New South Wales, and the singu-lar aspect of the native plants, are well known. There are gardeners and botanists esta-

Text Appearing After Image:
ilO HISTORY OF GARDENING. Part I. blished in and near Sidney, who collect seeds for England, and other parts of Europe ;and it is in contemplation to establish a government botanic garden there, wliich willdoubtless be of essential service in collecting and preserving native plants. The climateand soil of both settlements are favorable for horticulture. Potatoes, cabbages, carrots,parsnips, turnips, and every species of vegetable known in England, are producedin this colony. The cauliflower and broccoli, and tlie pea, arrive to greater perfectionthan in Europe ; but the bean and potatoe degenerate. Tlie climate is too hot for thebean, and the potatoe is only grown to advantage on new lands. New South Wales is famed for the goodness end variety of its fruits ; peaches, apricots, nectarines,oranges, grapes, pears, plums, figs, pomegianates, raspberries, strawberries, and melons of all sorts, attainthe highest degree of maturity in the open air; and even the pine-apple may be produced me

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 23:48:03

Tagged: , bookid:encyclopdiaofgar00loud , bookyear:1826 , bookdecade:1820 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Loudon__J__C___John_Claudius___1783_1843 , booksubject:Gardening , bookpublisher:London__Longman__Rees__Orme__Brown_and_Green , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:The_Library_of_Congress , bookleafnumber:122 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection

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