Home » Gardening » Image from page 135 of “Bird neighbors. An introductory acquaintance with one hundred and fifty birds commonly found in the gardens, meadows, and woods about our homes” (1916)

Image from page 135 of “Bird neighbors. An introductory acquaintance with one hundred and fifty birds commonly found in the gardens, meadows, and woods about our homes” (1916)

Identifier: cu31924000092589
Title: Bird neighbors. An introductory acquaintance with one hundred and fifty birds commonly found in the gardens, meadows, and woods about our homes
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Blanchan, Neltje, 1865-1918
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Garden City, N. Y., Doubleday, Page
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Text Appearing Before Image:
BLACK AND WHITE CREEPING WARBLER. DUSKY AND GRAY AND SLATE-COLORED BIRDS Chimney Swift Kingbird Wood Pewee Phoebe and Says Phoebe Crested Flycatcher Olive-sided Flycatcher Least Flycatcher Chickadee Tufted Titmouse Canada Jay Catbird Mocking-bird Junco White-breasted Nuthatch Red-breasted Nuthatch Loggerhead Shrike Northern Shrike Bohemian Waxwing Bay-breasted Warbler Chestnut-sided Warbler Golden-winged Warbler Myrtle Warbler Parula Warbler Black-throated Blue Warbler See also the Grayish Green and the Grayish Brown Birds, particularly the CedarBird, several Swallows, the Acadian and the Yellow-bellied Flycatchers; Alices andthe Olive-backed Thrushes; the Louisiana Water Thrush; the Blue-gray Gnat-catcher; and the Seaside Sparrow. See also the females of the following birds: PineGrosbeak; White-winged Red Crossbill; Purple Martin; and the Nashville, the Pine,and the Magnolia Warblers.

Text Appearing After Image:
ri[[MXi.:v SWIFT DUSKY, GRAY, AND SLATE-COLORED BIRDS Chimney Swift {Chatura pelagica) Swift family Called also: CHIMNEY SWALLOW; AMERICAN SWIFT Length—5 to 5.45 inches. About an inch shorter than the Eng-lish sparrow. Long wings make its length appear greater. A4ale and Female—Deep sooty gray; throat of a trifle lighter gray.Wings exteinB an inch and a half beyond the even tail, whichhas sharply pointed and very elastic quills, that serve as props.Feet are muscular, and have exceedingly sharp claws. Jiange—Peculiar to North America east of the Rockies, and fromLabrador to Panama. Migrations—April. September or October. Common summerresident. The chimney swift is, properly speaking, not a swallow atall, though chimney swallow is its more popular name. Rowingtowards the roof of your house, as if it used first one wing, thenthe other, its flight, while swift and powerful, is stiff and mechan-ical, unlike the swallows, and its entire aspect suggests a bat.The nighthawk and whippo

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-26 21:51:29

Tagged: , bookid:cu31924000092589 , bookyear:1916 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Blanchan__Neltje__1865_1918 , booksubject:Birds , bookpublisher:Garden_City__N__Y___Doubleday__Page , bookcontributor:Cornell_University_Library , booksponsor:MSN , bookleafnumber:135 , bookcollection:cornell , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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