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Image from page 180 of “Lutyens houses and gardens” (1921)

Image from page 180 of

Identifier: lutyenshousesga00weav
Title: Lutyens houses and gardens
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Weaver, Lawrence, 1876-1930
Subjects: Lutyens, Edwin Landseer, Sir, 1869-1944 Architecture, Domestic Gardens
Publisher: London, Offices of "Country life", ltd. [etc.] New York, C. Scribner’s Sons
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
left white. ment opening out of the west of the hall, with the room aboveit (the Solar *) and the porch, are of later date. A glance at the plan (Fig. 124) will show that nothingremains of the old house of Dixter but the hall, solar andporch, and when Mr. Nathaniel Lloyd acquired Dixter itpresented in some ways a rather woeful appearance, but itwas sound in its bones. In one respect the task of restora-tion was easy, for there was no work of later than the fifteenthcentury which had anv intrinsic merit entitling it to continuedexistence. All the additions to the original house weresheer defacements. The work was handled in an admirableway. It is obvious that when the two added floors whichcut up the hall, and that which divided the solar, and allthe cross partitions had been cleared out. the rooms avail-able, though large, were few. and it was necessary to decidehow the needful accommodation should be provided. Mr.Lloyd and Sir Edwin made visits to many of the yeomans Great Dixter 173

Text Appearing After Image:
125.—The Hall : West End. hall houses in the neighbourhood in order to mark the localpeculiarities of treatment, and among them was the typicalhouse at Benenden in Kent, which was known as The OldHouse at Home. It was very dilapidated, and the greatchimney-stack had lately collapsed and broken down thefloors and partitions in its fall. Its owner was then arrang-ing to demolish the framework, and Mr. Lloyd bought it.The transplanting of houses from their original site isgenerally a meaningless proceeding, greatly to be deprecated ;but in this case it was amply justified. Indeed, in no other 174 Great Dixter way could a valuable example of timber building have beenspared. It was accordingly rebuilt to the south-east of theDixter house. All the timbers were numbered and photo-graphed before being taken down and carried to the newsite, and the Benenden house was connected with the Hallof Dixter by a wholly new eastern wing. In designing thelatter, Sir Edwin made no sort of attempt to im

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 04:18:13

Tagged: , bookid:lutyenshousesga00weav , bookyear:1921 , bookdecade:1920 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Weaver__Lawrence__1876_1930 , booksubject:Lutyens__Edwin_Landseer__Sir__1869_1944 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Gardens , bookpublisher:London__Offices_of__Country_life___ltd___etc__ , bookpublisher:_New_York__C__Scribner_s_Sons , bookcontributor:University_of_Connecticut_Libraries , booksponsor:LYRASIS_Members_and_Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:180 , bookcollection:uconn_libraries , bookcollection:americana

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