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Image from page 181 of “The Garden : an illustrated weekly journal of gardening in all its branches” (1871)

Image from page 181 of

Identifier: gardenillustrate91876lond
Title: The Garden : an illustrated weekly journal of gardening in all its branches
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Gardening Horticulture
Publisher: London : [s.n.
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
e silver sand and mellow turfy loam.— W.B. H.■Waterproof Garments.—To waterproof cloth, take half apound of sugar of lead and half a pound of alum, and dissolve in abucket of soft water ; stir thoroughly half a dozen times at intervals,during which it may bo allowed to settle. When quite clear, poor itoff (without disturbing the sediment, which would discolour thecloth), and soak the coat or other article iu the liquid fortn-enty.fourhours ; then hang it up, and let it dry. Mil. Gladstone has been staying at Ilagley with Lord Lyttleton,and it is said that he has been working more vigorously than everat his favourite exercise—catting down trees. Can it be that thisattack on the monarchs of the forest is a prelude to more destruc.tive measures, and that political energy ia to follow upon the vigourshown in felling trees ?• Monatsschrift ties Veren-s ziir B.f.irdenm^ ilcs Gartonliauie : Uerlin. Supplement to The Garden, Office 3/; Southampton Street, Covent Garden, London, W.C.

Text Appearing After Image:
ROSE. SULTAN OF ZANZIBAR. ,:4 ^ Feb, 12, 1876.] THE GARDEN. 157 THE ART OF FORESTRY.The area over which the experience of the skilled forester extends isvery wide, whether regarded according to its geographical range, oraccording to its physiological extent. From the high-water line ofour tidal seas—from the lower level at which the scrub of the Ghoris washed by the rapid toirent of the Jordan, 1200 feet below thesurface-level of the llediterranean—to the lower line of perpetualsnow on lofty mountain i-anges, each orographic province, or zone ofvertical ascent, has its appropriate Flora. The forester must beacquainted, not with timber trees alone, but with at least as muchof the organic world as is connected, whether in a friendly or in ahostile mode, with their growth and welfare. As to actual trees, therange in size extends fronr the minute form of the Alpine Willow,which we have picked on the summit of Skiddaw, of less than .3 in.in height, to the lofty column of the majestic W

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 15:15:34

Tagged: , bookid:gardenillustrate91876lond , bookyear:1871 , bookdecade:1870 , bookcentury:1800 , booksubject:Gardening , booksubject:Horticulture , bookpublisher:London____s_n_ , bookcontributor:UMass_Amherst_Libraries , booksponsor:UMass_Amherst_Libraries , bookleafnumber:181 , bookcollection:umass_amherst_libraries , bookcollection:blc , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection

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