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Image from page 186 of “The garden bluebook;” (1915)

Image from page 186 of

Identifier: gardenbluebook00holl
Title: The garden bluebook;
Year: 1915 (1910s)
Authors: Holland, Leicester Bodine, 1882- [from old catalog]
Subjects: Perennials. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, Page & company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
mp; Height) Plant & Foliage (HqSU & Height) Uses Culture Propagation DICENTRA (From the Greek dis double, and kentron, spurred, originally misspelled Diclytra and supposed to be Dielytra) FumariacecE 98. Dicentra spectabilis {Dielytra spectabilis)English Names: Bleeding heart, Seal flower, Ladys reticule. JAPAN EARLY APRIL THROUGH JUNE DEEP rosy-red, flat, heart-shaped flowers with protruding white innerpetals, hanging delicately along graceful arching stems one to twofeet high. Foliage deeply cut and handsome, but not persistent. Theplant must be cut downor hidden after the flower-ing season. A very daintyand charming flower, anda great favorite in old-fashioned gardens. Ex-cellent for the herbaceousborder or for naturalizingin the wild garden. A perfectly hardy per-ennial of easiest culturein moderately rich, lightloam. Will grow in sunor shade, but thrives bestin partial shade. Propagate by divisionof crown or roots. Var. alba. Has whiteflowers, but a weak andsickly habit.

Text Appearing After Image:
169 Name YEAR 19 19 19 19 APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOTES ON THEYEARS CLIMATICCONDITIONS ET? General Observations N& LATIN NAME Common Name Season Habited. Flower (Color & Height) Plant & foliage (Habit & Height) Uses Culture Propagation DICTAMNUS (From the Greek name for the plant Diktamnos, from Dike, a mountain in Crete where the plant abounds) Rutacete 72. Dictamnus Fraxinella var. albus (*D. dlbus; Fraxinella alba; Fraxinella Dictamnus) English Names: Gas plant, Burning bush, Dittany, Fraxinella, Garden ginger. EUROPE, NORTH ASIA JUNE AND JULY FRAGRANT white flowers in long showy terminal spikes rising to aheight of two to three feet above a vigorous, upright bushy plant.The abundant foliage is a rich, dark leathery green, with oil glands dottingthe leaves, retained in per-fect condition through-out the season. Excel-lent for the herbaceousborder as it forms a per-manent, handsome, solid,dark green mass, and inblooming season theflowers are very effectiv

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 05:38:06

Tagged: , bookid:gardenbluebook00holl , bookyear:1915 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Holland__Leicester_Bodine__1882___from_old_catalog_ , booksubject:Perennials___from_old_catalog_ , bookpublisher:Garden_City__N_Y___Doubleday__Page___company , bookcontributor:The_Library_of_Congress , booksponsor:The_Library_of_Congress , bookleafnumber:186 , bookcollection:library_of_congress , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:fedlink , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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