Home » Gardening » Image from page 241 of “Gardening indoors and under glass; a practical guide to the planting, care and propagation of house plants, and to the construction and management of hotbed, cold-frame and small greenhouse” (1912)

Image from page 241 of “Gardening indoors and under glass; a practical guide to the planting, care and propagation of house plants, and to the construction and management of hotbed, cold-frame and small greenhouse” (1912)

Image from page 241 of

Identifier: gardeningindoors00rock
Title: Gardening indoors and under glass; a practical guide to the planting, care and propagation of house plants, and to the construction and management of hotbed, cold-frame and small greenhouse
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Rockwell, F. F. (Frederick Frye), 1884-
Subjects: House plants Cold-frames Greenhouses
Publisher: New York, McBride, Nast & Company
Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden
Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ER GLASS The best varieties of tomatoes for forcing areLorillard, Stirling Castle and Comet; of the cucum-bers, Arlington White Spine, Davis Perfected andthe English forcing varieties. If you do not like to stop having lettuce in timeto give up space to cucumbers or tomatoes, startsome plants about January first, and have a hotbedready to receive them from the flats before Marchfirst. With a little care as to ventilation and water-ing, they will come along just after the last of thegreenhouse crops. A point not to be overlooked in connection withall the above suggestions is that any surplus of thesefresh out-of-season things may be disposed ofamong your vegetable-hungry friends at the samestep-ladder prices they are paying the butcher orgreen-grocer for wilted, shipped-about products. And dont get discouraged if some of your experi-ments do not succeed the first time. Keep on plan-ning, studying and practicing until you are gettingthe maximum returns and pleasure from your glasshouse.

Text Appearing After Image:
Tomato plants, started in pots, ready for transplanting intothe bench

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 08:22:06

Tagged: , bookid:gardeningindoors00rock , bookyear:1912 , bookdecade:1910 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Rockwell__F__F___Frederick_Frye___1884_ , booksubject:House_plants , booksubject:Cold_frames , booksubject:Greenhouses , bookpublisher:New_York__McBride__Nast___Company , bookcontributor:The_LuEsther_T_Mertz_Library__the_New_York_Botanical_Garden , booksponsor:The_LuEsther_T_Mertz_Library__the_New_York_Botanical_Garden , bookleafnumber:241 , bookcollection:biodiversity , bookcollection:NY_Botanical_Garden , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection , BHL Consortium

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