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Image from page 40 of “The chronicles of a garden: its pets and its pleasures” (1864)

Image from page 40 of

Identifier: chroniclesofgard00wils
Title: The chronicles of a garden: its pets and its pleasures
Year: 1864 (1860s)
Authors: Wilson, Henrietta, d. 1863
Subjects: Gardening
Publisher: New York, R. Carter
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
hether it be botany that leads to gardening,or gardening that leads to botany, certain it is, that ineither case benefit and enjoyment will be doubled by thestudent becoming a workman, and the workman a student.We may fitly conclude this chapter by applying thewords spoken by Sir Henry Wotton, in praise of anghng,to the pursuit and practice of gardening :— It was anemployment for his idle time, which was then not idlyspent; for it was, after tedious study, a rest to his mind, acheerer of his spirits, a diverter of sadness, a calmer of un-quiet thoughts, a moderator of passions, a procurer of con-tentedness; it begat habits of peace and patience in thosethat professed and practised it. Crccs, dEirergmits, aiib Sjintk. • Oh lor a law, originating in the perception of comfort, and self-imposed, which should make the planting of a few trees an opera-tion as certain as tlie building of a house ! Men would live longerand better for the happiness thus given to their homes.—ManseGarden.

Text Appearing After Image:
IT may appear absurd to the owners of woods and foreststhat the trees of a villa, garden should be thoughtworthy of remark ; and perhaps some persons may considerthe leafy monarchs out of place in such a situation, and feelno regret at seeing them levelled low to make way forbeds and borders. It is indeed grievous to see the wantof taste and feeling shewn on this subject by almost all 16 THE CHRONICLES OF A GARDEN. classes concerned in the building of suburban residences.To judge by tlie unsparing use of the axe resorted to whena wooded park is feued for villas, be they mansions orcottages, one would think that a fine tree or group of treeswas a nuisance to be got quit of as quickly as possible, andthat no allotment of ground, whether of six acres or onlyconsisting of one, could be ready for either building on orlaying out as garden or shrubbery, till every tree had beenuprooted and the ground left bare as the blasted heath.Then the roads and pathways, where once we walked undershady

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-30 08:04:44

Tagged: , bookid:chroniclesofgard00wils , bookyear:1864 , bookdecade:1860 , bookcentury:1800 , bookauthor:Wilson__Henrietta__d__1863 , booksubject:Gardening , bookpublisher:New_York__R__Carter , bookcontributor:UMass_Amherst_Libraries , booksponsor:UMass_Amherst_Libraries , bookleafnumber:40 , bookcollection:umass_amherst_libraries , bookcollection:blc , bookcollection:americana , BHL Collection

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