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Image from page 99 of “Lutyens houses and gardens” (1921)

Image from page 99 of

Identifier: lutyenshousesga00weav
Title: Lutyens houses and gardens
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Weaver, Lawrence, 1876-1930
Subjects: Lutyens, Edwin Landseer, Sir, 1869-1944 Architecture, Domestic Gardens
Publisher: London, Offices of "Country life", ltd. [etc.] New York, C. Scribner’s Sons
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ewater is decidedly happy. It is a position where watershould have a certain degree of the precious, and that isgiven to it by the narrowness of the ways along which itis brought and by the use of thin rills—and of the littleloop pools breaking the harshness of the line—for thenecessary irrigation of the water-weeds. The size, too,of the pools, which begin and end the canals at the top andbottom of the water-terraces, is satisfying, while the architec-ture of the little enclosures at the head of these terraces 92 Hestercombe centres in the tiny rill dropping from the masks into theround pools with a sound that modestly calls attentionto it. The whole architectural composition is charming.The balustrade telling of an upper walk, the side niches—intended, of course, for the future reception of busts—the semi-circular arch framing the segmental scoop into thewall, the circular pool of limpid water, are all as good ascan be. The rotunda connects the original terrace alike with the

Text Appearing After Image:
66.—Looking Westwards across the Dutch Garden. main plat and water-gardens and with the orangery andDutch garden. These look to the south-east, and in frontof them is a natural tree-set lawn, levelled in two placesfor the purposes of croquet and tennis. As it is a slighthollow, there is a rise at its west and east boundaries aswell as to the north or main hillside. The buttressedretaining wall of the main formal garden, which we havejust left, forms the western boundary, but it is not at rightangles to the northern boundary. These boundaries arenot artificial lines set out on the drawing-board, but are Nature and the Formal Garden 93 dictated by the lie of the land. The upper or northernend, which thus fails to form a right angle with the westernside, is used for the remaining portions of the formalgardens. From the rotunda north of the east corner ofthe great plat, a stairway, with several flights of ampleand increasing breadth, descends to the terrace, on whichstands the orangery,

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Posted by Internet Archive Book Images on 2014-07-28 04:08:02

Tagged: , bookid:lutyenshousesga00weav , bookyear:1921 , bookdecade:1920 , bookcentury:1900 , bookauthor:Weaver__Lawrence__1876_1930 , booksubject:Lutyens__Edwin_Landseer__Sir__1869_1944 , booksubject:Architecture__Domestic , booksubject:Gardens , bookpublisher:London__Offices_of__Country_life___ltd___etc__ , bookpublisher:_New_York__C__Scribner_s_Sons , bookcontributor:University_of_Connecticut_Libraries , booksponsor:LYRASIS_Members_and_Sloan_Foundation , bookleafnumber:99 , bookcollection:uconn_libraries , bookcollection:americana

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